United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement Parties

Administrative bodies act slowly in accordance with international agreements Governments are not yet making progress in ending illegal fishing. The ORPs have all improved their ability to identify vessels by requiring all vessels fishing in their convention areas to have the numbers of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the seven-digit code managed by IHS Maritime. Implementation of these mandates is ongoing, as all regions have registers that still list vessels without IMO numbers. Similarly, these organizations have imposed the use of electronic vessel surveillance systems (VMS) in their areas of the convention, another important step. But they must act to ensure that these systems are effective. PROs can fulfill their obligation to apply the precautionary approach, including setting targets and limit values to maintain or restore stocks under the MDR. In addition to identifying and tracking fishing vessels, strong port controls are one of the most effective ways for governments to capture those who break the rules. Only three of the five tuna PMOs have port state controls in place, which need to be better integrated into national and regional processes to be effective. A review of the measures taken by the five tuna PMOs shows a number of progress in adopting harvesting strategies, which are the pre-agreed framework for fisheries management decisions, how and when quotas will be set. These strategies include specific rules to ensure that action is taken when the size of stocks or fishing violations are carried out against scientifically sound benchmarks.

However, progress is limited. No management organization has adopted a harvesting strategy for more than 25% of a region`s stocks. Large migratory fish is a term that has its origin in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. It refers to fish species that migrate marineally and also have a wide geographical distribution and generally refers to tuna and tuna, sharks, marlins and swordfish. Straddling fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to ineffective management systems and non-compliance with fishing interests. Straddling stocks are fish stocks that pass through or are located in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and came into force in 2001. [1] Article 18, point (d), requires flag states to impose “the identification of vessels and fishing gear for identification according to uniform and internationally recognized fishing and fishing systems.” While some depleted tuna boats, such as the Eastern Atlantic red spot, are recovering, many stocks exploited by the five MFOs continue to be overfished and overfished.

The inability of Member State governments to replenish depleted stocks means that they are not meeting their obligations under UNFSA. This issue needs to be addressed at the highest level and could be a key outcome of the conference. The analysis shows that the implementation of the fisheries stock agreement was inconsistent. Many stocks are still overexploited and some are in danger of collapsing. At the same time, the parties of the various PMOs are often unable to act because they are unable to reach a consensus. Management organizations can only be effective if members have the political will to take steps to achieve the objectives of the agreement. Port controls play a crucial role in preventing the intrusion of illegal fish into world markets, eliminating economic incentives for illegal operators and ensuring compliance with management measures.

United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement Parties